Soundtrack Albums

Movie Soundtrack Review – The Fast and The Furious

Year of Release: 2001

Record Label: Murder Inc Records/Def Jam Recordings/Universal Music Group

It is amazing how far the Fast & Furious franchise has gone as it has existed for nearly two decades. Nobody I know, including myself, would have ever thought that it would have gotten to eight films as of this year. Not to mention that it had evolved from a story that was grounded in reality, with a few over-the-top elements, to a big movie franchise with even more over-the-top elements.

Each film had a soundtrack album to go with it. I will talk about the one that started it all, the soundtrack to The Fast and The Furious.

The one that I have always wondered about this album is why Ja Rule was featured on the cover. He didn’t have that big of a role in the film, despite having been promoted in the trailers way back in the day. It almost seemed like his presence in the film was made to plug the soundtrack. I will also point out that only a few songs from this compilation were actually in the film itself. I still remember actually seeing a trailer on TV back in 2001 that even promoted the soundtrack artists. It should also be noted that on Amazon back in those days, many consumers rated this so low because they were expecting a bunch of techno and house music that was in the movie. First off, they should have read the back cover, and second, they also should have looked at the list of artists on the front cover. Of course being the hip-hop head that I am, I was right at home with this album.

I had theorized that one reason that Ja Rule’s face was on the cover of this album was because he actually appeared in five songs on this album. But make no mistake about this, a few of those songs were previously released, but the majority of those songs actually appeared in the film. If you remember seeing the trailers or the TV spots from back in the day (You can always watch them on YouTube if not), one song that was used in the promotion was “Furious” from Ja Rule, Vita, and 0-1. Actually, the song was originally called “Fuck You” on the Rule 3:36 album, but to be fair, the beat actually gets you revved up and goes with the tone of the film itself, while Vita provided a good portion for the chorus and 0-1 actually did a good job in his verse. One thing that I must note is that a clean version of this exists with some lyrics changed a bit. I can’t find a video to show it, but it is heard in the credits of the film and I believe that the video was included as an extra on the DVD for the film.

The rest of the songs from Ja had on this album were decent. I liked the “Good Life Remix” with Faith Evans, along with Caddillac Tah and Vita. “Life Ain’t a Game” had a good beat from Damizza. I also kind liked the collaboration with Tank on “Race Against Time, Part 2.” It seemed that it was more Tank’s song here as he sang more verses whereas Ja only provided one verse. Of course, it’s not unheard of as many years later the roles switched between the two parts of “Love The Way You Lie” from Eminem and Rihanna as the first one appeared on Em’s album and the second one appeared on Rihanna’s album. However, I often wondered why the remix of “Put It on Me” appeared on here. My only guess is that because it got more radio airplay compared to the album version from Rule 3:36 and this version probably needed to get released on an album rather than just as a single. I can’t complain because I have always liked this version.

Regarding whether the rest of the Inc had a part in this album, there were only a few songs from some artists from that label as the rest were from people who weren’t on the label. One of my other favorite songs was “Pov City Anthem” from Caddillac Tah. I actually remembered seeing the video on TV back in the day and thinking it was a good song. It makes me wonder why for many years I skipped “The Prayer” from Black Child as that one was actually a good track on this album. Meanwhile, regarding other songs from Murder Inc members, the other two was a hit and miss. The hit would probably Ashanti’s “When a Man Does Wrong.” While it was out of place for an album like this and I really don’t remember hearing it in the film (Along with other tracks on here), it is still worth a listen. However, I can’t really say much about Vita and Ashanti’s cover of the Madonna song, “Justify My Love.” To be perfectly honest, I didn’t even know that there was a video for this song until now.

I can see that the video was similar to the video of the original. I can give credit where it’s due, but it is still kind of odd to listen to.

As for the rest of the album, a lot of them were decent, if good, but in a lot of ways I questioned why they were put in. Now I liked “Hustlin” from Fat Joe and Armageddon, as well as “Suicide” from Scarface, but I saw no reason for “Freestyle” from Boo & Gotti. I will listen to it, but it just seems out of place like it could have been put on a mixtape, with the uses of the beats from two Dr. Dre songs, “The Watcher” and “Fuck You.” Also, the inclusion of the rap version of “Rollin'” from Limp Bizkit was probably added in to go with the fact that it was a hip-hop compilation. A few seconds of the original version were heard in the film, but I guess Def Jam needed the hip-hop song to fit on here. I can’t complain as I was never a big fan of Limp Bizkit, not even when they were popular when I was in junior high (Although there are a FEW songs that I like of theirs).

It may seem that what was written in the previous paragraph that I didn’t think much of this album. Not the case. In fact, I actually like this album, but in hindsight, I can kind of agree with some people when they complained about how a lot of songs on here weren’t in the movie. As a hip-hop fan, this album is still a good one in my eyes, but at the same time it just made me wonder if Irv Gotti had a lot of creative control over this album and just included some other songs just because. I guess that explains why Universal and Island Records put out “More Music from The Fast and The Furious” much later on, which included some of the techno songs, but even I looked online and much of the songs on there weren’t in the movie, either. Not to mention that a lot of complaints surrounding that album had to do with it being copyright-protected and how it couldn’t be played on certain players. In many ways I am glad that I didn’t actually buy the CD of that. Regarding this album, one song that would have been great to be included was “Say Ah” from Shawnna, but it wasn’t. It’s such a shame because I liked what I heard. I can understand why “Area Codes” wasn’t in it as that was used for the Rush Hour 2 soundtrack, which came out that same year.

Overall, I recommend this album mainly if you are just looking for a decent rap compilation, not a soundtrack to the film itself.

3.5/5

NEXT UP: 2 Fast 2 Furious soundtrack

Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Furious
  2. Pov City Anthem
  3. The Prayer
  4. Hustlin’
  5. Good Life Remix
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Compilation Review – Irv Gotti Presents: The Remixes

Year of Release: 2002

Label: Murder Inc Records/Murda Management

Here I am in my final review of the Murder Inc compilations. Okay, technically that is not true as I have the soundtrack to The Fast and The Furious to do, but I will do that for my Fast & Furious soundtrack marathon special when the eighth film comes out. But other than that, I had devoted this month to reviewing the compilations from The Inc. I may do some other stuff in the future like maybe try to review Ja Rule’s albums, maybe Ashanti’s albums and Lloyd’s albums as I am not opposed to doing reviews of R&B albums for this site. I also am considering finding a way to listen to the unreleased albums of Vita and Charli Baltimore, or at least some unreleased material that they put out. Until then, I am closing off this special with “Irv Gotti Presents: The Remixes.”

This album was released four months after “Irv Gotti Presents: The Inc,” which I can say that at the time the label was on fire (Until 50 Cent started making it a trend to hate on the label). While the second Murder Inc compilation was done to showcase what more the label had to offer during that time, this compilation was released to showcase, well, remixes, at least for the most part.

You would know if a song is a remix because on the back of the case it says “Remix,” but not all of the songs are remixes. Some of them are original tracks that feature some of the label’s talent, and I suppose that Gotti wanted to release them to help market them. Or maybe they didn’t make the cut for the previous compilation.

I first must talk about the remixes to Ashanti’s hit songs from that time. The main thing that I had noticed is that there are TWO remixes to “Baby,” one of which had Scarface and the other had Crooked I. The version with Scarface was similar to the original version and he did a couple of verses that went well with the song. I have a feeling that Face’s contribution to the song was probably because “Baby” had the exact same beat as his song called “Mary Jane” from his album, “Untouchable.” As for the version with Crooked I, he had a couple of verses, too, but there were some parts that I felt were a bit out of place when he rapped. No disrespect for Crooked I, but I didn’t exactly think much of that version. He had decent rhymes and is a good rapper, but his bit seemed out of place when he rapped about thuggin’ and stuff. Scarface, on the other hand, had some deep rhymes in that version. If anything, I think the Scarface version is better.

As for the “Happy” remix, while the original sampled the Gap Band’s “Outstanding” to some degree, this version had lifted the beat completely and it felt like a cover to that song. Ashanti even paid homage to that song in some parts, while Charli Baltimore, D.O. Cannon, and Young Merc added the raps to the song.

If you want to talk about a good remix on here, look no further than the remix to “The Pledge.” While Ashanti sang the chorus this song and the beat was the same, it felt like a different song from the original as there was more emphasis on Nas and Ja Rule rapping on this song. One thing that I noticed is that Ja took a few shots at DMX in this song (As they were beefing during that time) and he sort of bit 2Pac in some areas (Let’s not get into the closing parts of the song or the whole thing that escalated in his beef with 50 Cent), he did a good job in this song. Nas also did a good job in his part.

I could only think of one other remix to a song that was worth noting. The remix to “O.G.” from Black Child and Caddillac Tah actually improved on the original. However, the remix to “No One Does It Better” did not include Charli Baltimore at all as she was in the original. I didn’t mind it, but there could have been one verse from her when it was mainly Ja, Tah, and Black Child on it.

The rest of the album were original tracks that I wondered why they were there in the first place. One song in particular was “Me and My Boyfriend” from Toni Braxton, which Irv Gotti had produced. Now I don’t think it’s a bad song. Toni’s vocals are good as always she always impresses with her singing, but this song was more or less a knock-off or cover of 2Pac’s “Me and My Girlfriend,” but then again you also had “03 Bonnie and Clyde” from Jay-Z and Beyonce that came out around the same time. The rest of the original tracks felt like filler, with the exception of “Come-N-Go,” which was a standout.

For some reason, the album also included “Rainy Dayz” from Mary J. Blige and Ja Rule, and also “Unfoolish” from Ashanti and The Notorious B.I.G. I find this pointless considering how “Unfoolish” was already on Ashanti’s self-titled album and “Rainy Dayz” was on the 2002 re-release of “No More Drama.” In some ways I could understand the latter being on here, but in that case, there could have also been other remixes added to here like “I’m Real” and “Ain’t It Funny,” both of which had Jennifer Lopez. I am aware that they were released on different albums prior to this, but being that this was a remix album, why couldn’t they include those songs?

To Murder Inc’s credit, there were some decent tracks on here that stand out. Some of the other songs felt like filler. I am not really sure where I stand on this album, even though I very much prefer the other two compilations that they had put out. I know it’s a remix album, so it’s different, but at the same time there was some room for improvement in some areas. I would say that this album was just average at best.

3/5

Top 5 Tracks:

  1. The Pledge Remix
  2. Baby Remix (The one with Scarface)
  3. Come-N-Go
  4. I’m So Happy Remix
  5. O.G. Remix
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Movie Soundtrack Review – Tales From The Hood

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Year: 1995

Label: 40 Acres and a Mule Musicworks/MCA Records

Track Listing:

  1. Let Me At Them – Wu-Tang Clan
  2. Face Mob – Facemob feat. Scarface
  3. Tales From The Hood – Domino
  4. Born II Die – Spice 1
  5. Ol’ Dirty’s Back – Ol’ Dirty Bastard
  6. I’m Talkin’ To Myself – NME & Grench The Mean 1
  7. The Hood Got Me Feelin’ The Pain – Havoc & Prodeje feat. Dawn Green
  8. One Less N***a – MC Eiht
  9. From The Darkside – Gravediggaz
  10. Death Represents My Hood – Bokie Loc
  11. Hot Ones Echo Through The Ghetto – The Click
  12. The Grave – NGN feat. Killa

Prior to starting this blog, I had plans to write pieces on a bunch of albums in my collection and until now, I decided to wait until a particular time to write one on the soundtrack to the 1995 film “Tales From The Hood.” Now why did I wait until October to write a review on this film’s soundtrack? I figured because it’s Halloween-time and what better time than to write it on this? Anyway, let’s get on with it.

This album is quite a mixed bag, but I don’t mean in terms of quality. I mostly mean in terms of style. On one hand you have songs that are dark and creepy. On another hand you have some songs that are just straight violent and have more of a gangsta feel, and then you have some songs that either have some somber feel to it or just a little more of a straight hip-hop feel to it. So despite being the soundtrack to a horror film, it is not a horrorcore rap album, at least not at 100 percent.

To put it bluntly on the latter category, a couple of good examples of just straight hip-hop are the tracks, “Let Me At Them” and “Ol’ Dirty’s Back,” both of which are from two Wu-Tang Clan members, Inspectah Deck and Ol’ Dirty Bastard. First thing I must note is that even though it says that it’s a Wu-Tang Clan song, it’s only Inspectah Deck on the song. Not that it’s a bad thing, as it’s a standout track from him, but it could have just listed him instead of the group’s name or at least “Inspectah Deck of Wu-Tang Clan.” Anyway, “Let Me At Them” is a good track to kick things off as it is Deck spitting some sick rhymes in the process. It almost feels like he has one long verse in the song and he even produced the beat, according to the booklet. What a way to kick it off.

Now what about the ODB track? The only thing that I didn’t like about the track was the intro, with some boy calling out the names of west coast rappers, but then ODB said “Enough respect to the west coast,” as it is no dis to them. The beat on this song was rather grimy and ODB, along with his brother 12 O’Clock, had some good rhymes on this song. So score another one for the Wu on this album.

Regarding the gangsta tracks, “Face Mob” from…well, Facemob was actually a hardcore track in its own right. The first verse was done by Scarface and I think DMG and Smit-D were the ones who did the other two. The beat had a dark and gritty feel for the song and the lyrics went with it. While The Click’s “Hot Ones Echo Through The Ghetto” had a more upbeat feel to it with its beat, while the verses from each member were good, but it seems that E-40 and B-Legit had more than D-Shot and Suga-T, not to mention that she had the shortest verse on the song. Of course, frequent Sick-Wid-It collaborator, Levitti, provided the vocals on the chorus. And then you have a more somber-type of song from MC Eiht called “One Less N***a.” This song is like a mix of “Take Two With Me” and “Nuthin’ But Da Gangsta” from his first solo album, “We Come Strapped.” It has a more mellow yet somber beat that is mixed with hardcore lyrics. Not a bad mixture. I wouldn’t doubt if he had done this song not long after that album as it is similar to those two aforementioned tracks.

Then you have “The Hood Got Me Feelin’ Pain” from Havoc & Prodeje of South Central Cartel, NOT to be confused with Mobb Deep (The spelling of Prodeje is different from Prodigy), which is a song about the hard times in the hood. It felt like an emotional song from these guys and they spoke about the struggles. Dope track in my opinion.

Domino’s “Tales From The Hood” talks about the trials and tribulations of living in the hood as well. Domino mostly sang on this track and I think that was mostly his style looking back, as I still don’t really know much about him outside of “Getto Jam.” The rapper, Chill, on this track did a decent verse. Also, the beat was rather mellow, yet a little creepy.

Now we get to the horrorcore tracks. The odd thing about these tracks is that the majority of them were done by guys I have never even heard of before buying this album, while two other tracks were done by guys who are more known. I will start with the more known guys first.

Let me just say that one of the horrorcore tracks that stood out the most in this album was “Born II Die” from Spice 1. Now I know Spice 1 has more of a gangsta-style in his music, but this song has horror written all over it with his graphically violent lyrics and rather horror-style beat. Hell, I wonder if the beat that was used in the trailer for the film was a slowed down version of this song. If you saw the movie, there is no denying how well it went with that sequence.

“From The Darkside” by Gravediggaz also has a horror-like beat to it. It seems that it sampled some opera song. The beat was mixed by Prince Paul. I am going to tell you right now, you will get the chorus stuck in your head with them saying “You are dumb, and deaf, and blind.” It’s just infectious in an odd way.

Now we get to the three tracks from the unknowns. I don’t know if any of these guys had recorded albums after this, but if not, it’s a real shame, because these three songs are exceptional and have a good horrorcore vibe to them. Not to mention that the rappers had good verses in those songs. My favorite of the three is “The Grave,” especially when you hear that deep voice and that evil laugh towards the end of the song. However, “I’m Talkin’ To Myself” and “Death Represents My Hood” are still good tracks.

I have to say that this was a good soundtrack to an underrated horror film that I have seen. You have some straight-up hip-hop tracks, a couple of songs that talked about life in the hood, then you also have gangsta tracks and also horrorcore tracks. I mean it’s good that there was some variety on this soundtrack. Overall, I give it a 4/5.

Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Born II Die
  2. The Grave
  3. Let Me At Them
  4. Hot Ones Echo Through The Ghetto
  5. Death Represents My Hood
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Movie Soundtrack: Original Gangstas

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Year: 1996

Label: Noo Trybe Records

Track Listing:

  1. Inner City Blues – Ideal
  2. The World is a Ghetto – Geto Boys feat. Flaj
  3. X.O. – Luniz
  4. On The Grind – The Click
  5. White Chalk Part II – Junior M.A.F.I.A.
  6. How Many – N.O. Joe feat. 3rd Degree
  7. Flowamatic 9 – 3x Krazy
  8. Ain’t No Fun – Dino of H-Town feat. Teddy
  9. Rivals – Facemob feat. Scarface
  10. War’s On – The Almighty RSO feat. Mobb Deep
  11. Who Wanna Be The Villain – MC Ren
  12. Slugs – Spice 1
  13. How Does It Feel – Ice-T
  14. Good Stuff – Smooth

Another soundtrack album I am reviewing, and it’s from the same year as the album I previously reviewed. Detect a pattern? That’s not important. What’s important is this review. This is the soundtrack to the 1996 film “Original Gangstas,” which starred a lot of veterans in those Blaxploitation films from the 1970s, particularly the likes of Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Pam Grier, along with supporting roles from Richard Roundtree and Ron O’Neal and they basically played original gangsters battling against a new gang that took over their old neighborhood. Hence the title. The thing about this film is no matter how cheesy it was, it still had some good music in the soundtrack (Of course, there are worse movies out there that still have good soundtracks, and I WILL touch on those later).

The opening song, “Inner City Blues,” actually started a minute into the track, because there was actually dialogue from the movie right before the song started. Anyway, the song is from Ideal, an R&B group mostly known for songs that came out a few years after this one like “Get Gone” and “Whatever.” I will say that when Ideal came out with those songs, I thought to myself “Could this be the same group that did the song from the ‘Original Gangstas’ soundtrack?” and I am certain that nobody else around me knew of this song as I remember seeing a video for this song on TV back in 1996. I also must note that this song is a cover to Marvin Gaye’s song of the same name. The song itself had a good then-up-to-date sound to it. It did not sound like the original version, but it did not need to. Plus, it went well with the movie’s theme. This is actually one of my top favorite songs. 5/5

Right after one cover comes another as the Geto Boys covered War’s “The World is a Ghetto.” Okay, so it’s not a direct cover as the verses are completely different, but the chorus and the beat have similar vibes to the original version, however, with a hip-hop twist. This song is more socially-conscious, by the way. Scarface started the song with a good verse, but the second verse stood out more as Bushwick Bill delivered some of the hardest hitting lyrics in the whole song. Check this out:

Five hundred niggas died in guerrilla warfare
In a village in Africa, but didn’t nobody care
They just called up the goddamn gravedigga
And said come get these muthafuckin niggas
Just like they do in the 5th Ward
In the South Park and The Bronx and the Watts
You know they got crooked cops
Working for the system
Makin’ po muthafuckas out of victims
Don’t nobody give a fuck about the po
It’s double jeopardy if your black or Latino
They got muthafuckin drugs in the slums
Got us killing one another over crumbs
Think I’m lying? Well muthafucka I got proof
Name a section in your city where minorities group
And I’ma show you prostitutes, dope and hard times
And a murder rate that never declines
And little babies sittin on the porch smellin’ smelly
Cryin cause they ain’t got no food in they bellies
They call my neighbourhood a jungle
And me an animal, like they do the people in Rwanda
Fools fleeing their countries to come here black
But see the same bullshit and head right back
They find out what others already know
The world is a ghetto
Willie D also delivered some hard rhymes right after Bill’s verse, but in my personal opinion, Bushwick Bill killed it in his verse. Another one of my top favorite tracks. 5/5
After two covers of classic songs, we now get an original track,”X.O.” from Luniz. The one thing that stands out the most about the song is the beat. It has a smooth, yet intense feel to it. The song’s subject matter was mostly about alcohol and getting drunk. It’s kind of basic, but the beat’s nice. 3.5/5
“On The Grind” from The Click was decent, but there were some parts that could have made the song better. Maybe it was the chorus, because the verses from Suga-T and D-Shot at the beginning were decent, but B-Legit and E-40’s verses in the second act were better, and then all four had back-to-back verses in the third act of the song. The beat wasn’t bad either. It still could have been better. 3.5/5
Junior M.A.F.I.A. kicked this album into a higher gear with “White Chalk Part II.” I am a little unfamiliar with this group other than the fact that The Notorious B.I.G. was a part of it, as well as Lil’ Kim, neither of whom had verses on this song. However, the beat was nice as were the verses, but the beat stood out more, in my opinion. 3.5/5
Still in that same gear comes “How Many” from N.O. Joe. Did I mention that this is actually one of three songs that he contributed to on this compilation? Well, it’s true, as he produced “The World is a Ghetto” and “X.O.” but here is a song that he produced and has his name as the main credit. I am not sure if he rapped on this song, because there was another guy on here. The beat is sick, though. The subject matter is sort of basic as the lyrics are rather violent. On the beat side, I rate this a 5/5 and the lyrics part probably gets 4. Overall: 4/5
It’s about to get crazy up in here. Three times crazy, that is. Okay, that sucked. Anyway, “Flowamatic 9” from 3x Krazy is one of my other favorite songs from this album. Sick beat, ill rhymes, and not a bad chorus from Suga-T of The Click. What I find weird is that 3x Krazy had named one of their compilations “Flowamatic 9” and did not include this song. Seriously, this should have been included. 5/5
Now we slow things down with another R&B song on this album. “Ain’t No Fun” from the late Dino from the group H-Town has a sexual type of feel to it that could probably get people in the mood, but the song’s subject matter left more to be desired. It’s not much different than Snoop Dogg’s “Ain’t No Fun (If The Homies Can’t Have None),” except it’s R&B, not rap. The beat and the vocals weren’t bad at all, as it does set the mood, but the subject matter made the song lose some points. 2.5/5
Now we’re back to that hardcore gangsta shit. “Rivals” is a song from a short-lived super-group called Facemob, that has Scarface as one of the top members, along with somewhat-known artists like DMG and Devin The Dude. Now I am familiar with Devin The Dude to some degree, but in hindsight it seemed that he was out of his element trying to be a gangsta rapper. The worst part of this song is probably the female rapper 350, but I could go on about this more on their album, “The Other Side of the Law,” which I also own and may review in the future. I have to hand it to Devin for trying and DMG had a good verse on this song. Scarface mainly had the chorus to work with, so it was mainly just to have the rest of the group shine. One of my least favorite songs on this album, but not terrible. 2.5/5
“War’s On” is from a little-known group called The Almighty RSO, and better-known group called Mobb Deep. Now I will say that I am familiar with ONE of the members of RSO, and that is Raydog aka Benzino, who was mainly known for initiating a beef with Eminem back in the early-2000s, but that’s neither here nor there. Back to the song. One thing to know is that the credit may say Mobb Deep as part of the song, it’s mainly Prodigy who has a verse. However, Havoc produced this song, so it’s still a song that involved both members. Now as for the verses in this song, the only one that stood out the most was Prodigy’s verse. Benzino (I am mainly calling him this as he was mostly known by this name) was never a great rapper and he didn’t really have a great verse either, but it was not horrible. The other RSO members were okay at best. 3/5, mainly for Mobb Deep’s contribution.
Former N.W.A. member MC Ren dropped his contribution to the soundtrack with “Who Wanna Be The Villain.” The beat is a little different from what has been heard here so far, as it has more of a scary/creepy vibe to it. Ren had always been the most underrated members of the legendary group, and he should have gotten more exposure. This song shows that he was lyrically gifted. 4/5
Now for one of my other top favorite songs on here. Spice 1 kicks dope verses in his song “Slugs,” which doesn’t have anything to do with a certain creature I will tell you that. One of the parts that I like in this song is when it pays homage to “Slippin’ Into Darkness” from War. This song reminds me of a few songs from his album “1990-Sick” which came out months before this soundtrack did. 5/5
Second to the last song and we get one from a legend in the game, the one and only Ice-T. However, “How Does It Feel” is not one of his strongest songs. That does not mean it was bad. It could have been better. I see that it’s one of those “dirty raps” so it has sexual lyrics. It has a smooth beat, and Ice delivered on the lyrics a bit, but part of it still feels weak in some areas. 3/5
The soundtrack closed out with “Good Stuff” from Smooth. This is an R&B song, by the way. The song is sort of typical with Smooth singing and talking about she needs passion and a man’s touch and all that stuff. I liked the beat, and Smooth didn’t have bad verses, but the talking parts were a weak point in the song and it overshadowed everything else. It could have been a lot better. 2/5
Does this album still hold up? I will say that this was not a top-to-bottom great album, but there were hits than misses on here. I will say that out of the R&B tracks on here, only one was actually good, another could have been better even though it had some moments, while the last one just was not great at all. As for the rap tracks, a lot of them were good, even some of the lower-rated ones had some shining moments. I like the soundtrack, but it was not a great soundtrack by any means. I recommend it, though.
3.5/5 overall

Top Five Tracks:

  1. Inner City Blues
  2. The World Is A Ghetto
  3. Slugs
  4. Flowamatic 9
  5. Who Wanna Be The Villain
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