Soundtrack Albums

Movie Soundtrack Review – Bones

Year of Release: 2001

Record Label: Doggystyle Records/Priority Records

Click here for my review of the movie.

I have been long overdue for this. I have been meaning to write a review on this for a while, especially when I do it in the middle of October. Last year, when I devoted most of my reviews to the Flatlinerz and Gravediggaz, I felt that I was missing something. I noted in one of my reviews that doing horrorcore rap albums should not really matter in the middle of October, as there are numerous horrorcore acts out there. But I had meaning to do this regardless. However, it would be hard to really label this a horrorcore album, as there were very few songs of that nature on this. How so? Well, let’s find out.

This soundtrack kicked off with an intro bit that had Snoop Dogg, who played the title character from the movie, “Bones,” of which this was the soundtrack. It was not really a song, but rather a narration of the character and his cause with music in the background. It had a nice beat to it, as it quite a funky and jazzy feel. However, what really kicked it off was the song, “The Legend of Jimmy Bones” from RBX, Snoop, and MC Ren. THIS song really had the horrorcore feel, and in a lot of ways, it was related to the movie as it talked about some bits of the plot, not to mention that there was a sound clip from the movie towards the end. The beat really gave it an unsettling feel.

One could expect that this album had a lot of Snoop’s affiliates on it, and that would be correct. Being that this was released under Snoop’s label, it seemed that it was to showcase some of the talent that it had. One song that stood out was “Lost Angels in the Sky” from Lost Angels and Kokane. I am not familiar with Lost Angels, though I am familiar with Kokane, who had done a lot of hooks for Snoop and crew back in the day. It had a great beat done by Battlecat, who had done “G’d Up” from Tha Eastsidaz and “We Can Freak It” from Kurupt in the past. In fact, a lot of people from Snoop’s crew appeared on here, ranging from Kurupt to Nate Dogg, and what better guy to do a hook on a song than this guy? May he rest in peace, by the way.

What I find funny is the song, “It’s Jimmy” from Kurupt and Roscoe. Not a bad song by any means, especially when it’s a collab between this brotherly duo, but this album came out around the time of “The Saga Continues” from P. Diddy and the Bad Boy Family, and the chorus was similar to the song “Diddy.” I am certain that the chorus was derived from another song, but it’s hard not to compare the two.

One song that can really get your head bump is “Death of Snow White,” which featured Bad Azz, along with Chan and Coniyac, 2/3 of short-lived female rap act Doggy’s Angels (Remember them?). Funny I should mention them as the other member, Kola, appeared on the track that followed called “If You Came Here To Party.” Warren G produced a phat beat for that track. If anything, some of these songs could be played at parties or gatherings, and some of them can be danced to, especially “Raise Up” from Kokane. Also, Snoop did a damn good job at paying homage to “Payback” from James Brown on “Jimmy’s Revenge.” Fredwreck did a good job on the production of this song, one of many songs that he produced for this album.

However, it was not just Snoop’s own crew on this album, as there were some cuts from D12 and Cypress Hill. I can’t complain about “These Drugs” from D12, and things were hot for them during the time this came out as “Devil’s Night” came out the summer of that same year. Cypress Hill has never disappointed me with their music, so it was no exception, though I will say a longer version of “Memories” appeared on their album “Stoned Raiders,” which was released not too long after this album had come out. There was another track from a group that was outside of Snoop’s circle, as Outkast appeared on here and collaborated with Snoop on the remix to “So Fresh, So Clean.” I don’t mind that track, by the way, but it felt kind of loud when hearing the beat. Another song from FT was actually pretty dope on a lyrical level and the beat wasn’t too bad either. It had an East Coast vibe to it.

One thing that I had noticed when I was younger is that a lot of these hip-hop soundtracks more often than not had to have at least one R&B track for some reason. Now I do like R&B, but it just seemed that there were not a lot of hip-hop movie soundtracks that were top-to-bottom rap. Anyway, I did like the song “Ballad of Jimmy Bones” from Latoiya Williams, as it did relate to the movie and her soulful vocals really captured the feel for the song. As for “This is My Life,” the singer Kedrick has some decent vocals, but it would have been better if CPO had at least another verse, so it could have been equally singing and rapping. I also liked how “Be Thankful” from William Devaughn was added, as that song was played in the movie. It was a shortened version, as there needed to be more room for the other songs. However, I don’t think that the song “Endo” needed to be put in, as I was not sure what the purpose was. Was it an original score track? I know that Fredwreck produced it, but it just didn’t feel like it needed to be on it.

This album had a good amount of variety on here, but it really did not have a horrorcore vibe as a lot of the cuts were gangsta. Some were even good to play at parties. Even 17 years later, this album still holds up.

4/5

Top Five Tracks

  1. The Legend of Jimmy Bones
  2. These Drugs
  3. Memories
  4. Ballad of Jimmy Bones
  5. Fuck With Us
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Movie Soundtrack: Original Gangstas

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Year: 1996

Label: Noo Trybe Records

Track Listing:

  1. Inner City Blues – Ideal
  2. The World is a Ghetto – Geto Boys feat. Flaj
  3. X.O. – Luniz
  4. On The Grind – The Click
  5. White Chalk Part II – Junior M.A.F.I.A.
  6. How Many – N.O. Joe feat. 3rd Degree
  7. Flowamatic 9 – 3x Krazy
  8. Ain’t No Fun – Dino of H-Town feat. Teddy
  9. Rivals – Facemob feat. Scarface
  10. War’s On – The Almighty RSO feat. Mobb Deep
  11. Who Wanna Be The Villain – MC Ren
  12. Slugs – Spice 1
  13. How Does It Feel – Ice-T
  14. Good Stuff – Smooth

Another soundtrack album I am reviewing, and it’s from the same year as the album I previously reviewed. Detect a pattern? That’s not important. What’s important is this review. This is the soundtrack to the 1996 film “Original Gangstas,” which starred a lot of veterans in those Blaxploitation films from the 1970s, particularly the likes of Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Pam Grier, along with supporting roles from Richard Roundtree and Ron O’Neal and they basically played original gangsters battling against a new gang that took over their old neighborhood. Hence the title. The thing about this film is no matter how cheesy it was, it still had some good music in the soundtrack (Of course, there are worse movies out there that still have good soundtracks, and I WILL touch on those later).

The opening song, “Inner City Blues,” actually started a minute into the track, because there was actually dialogue from the movie right before the song started. Anyway, the song is from Ideal, an R&B group mostly known for songs that came out a few years after this one like “Get Gone” and “Whatever.” I will say that when Ideal came out with those songs, I thought to myself “Could this be the same group that did the song from the ‘Original Gangstas’ soundtrack?” and I am certain that nobody else around me knew of this song as I remember seeing a video for this song on TV back in 1996. I also must note that this song is a cover to Marvin Gaye’s song of the same name. The song itself had a good then-up-to-date sound to it. It did not sound like the original version, but it did not need to. Plus, it went well with the movie’s theme. This is actually one of my top favorite songs. 5/5

Right after one cover comes another as the Geto Boys covered War’s “The World is a Ghetto.” Okay, so it’s not a direct cover as the verses are completely different, but the chorus and the beat have similar vibes to the original version, however, with a hip-hop twist. This song is more socially-conscious, by the way. Scarface started the song with a good verse, but the second verse stood out more as Bushwick Bill delivered some of the hardest hitting lyrics in the whole song. Check this out:

Five hundred niggas died in guerrilla warfare
In a village in Africa, but didn’t nobody care
They just called up the goddamn gravedigga
And said come get these muthafuckin niggas
Just like they do in the 5th Ward
In the South Park and The Bronx and the Watts
You know they got crooked cops
Working for the system
Makin’ po muthafuckas out of victims
Don’t nobody give a fuck about the po
It’s double jeopardy if your black or Latino
They got muthafuckin drugs in the slums
Got us killing one another over crumbs
Think I’m lying? Well muthafucka I got proof
Name a section in your city where minorities group
And I’ma show you prostitutes, dope and hard times
And a murder rate that never declines
And little babies sittin on the porch smellin’ smelly
Cryin cause they ain’t got no food in they bellies
They call my neighbourhood a jungle
And me an animal, like they do the people in Rwanda
Fools fleeing their countries to come here black
But see the same bullshit and head right back
They find out what others already know
The world is a ghetto
Willie D also delivered some hard rhymes right after Bill’s verse, but in my personal opinion, Bushwick Bill killed it in his verse. Another one of my top favorite tracks. 5/5
After two covers of classic songs, we now get an original track,”X.O.” from Luniz. The one thing that stands out the most about the song is the beat. It has a smooth, yet intense feel to it. The song’s subject matter was mostly about alcohol and getting drunk. It’s kind of basic, but the beat’s nice. 3.5/5
“On The Grind” from The Click was decent, but there were some parts that could have made the song better. Maybe it was the chorus, because the verses from Suga-T and D-Shot at the beginning were decent, but B-Legit and E-40’s verses in the second act were better, and then all four had back-to-back verses in the third act of the song. The beat wasn’t bad either. It still could have been better. 3.5/5
Junior M.A.F.I.A. kicked this album into a higher gear with “White Chalk Part II.” I am a little unfamiliar with this group other than the fact that The Notorious B.I.G. was a part of it, as well as Lil’ Kim, neither of whom had verses on this song. However, the beat was nice as were the verses, but the beat stood out more, in my opinion. 3.5/5
Still in that same gear comes “How Many” from N.O. Joe. Did I mention that this is actually one of three songs that he contributed to on this compilation? Well, it’s true, as he produced “The World is a Ghetto” and “X.O.” but here is a song that he produced and has his name as the main credit. I am not sure if he rapped on this song, because there was another guy on here. The beat is sick, though. The subject matter is sort of basic as the lyrics are rather violent. On the beat side, I rate this a 5/5 and the lyrics part probably gets 4. Overall: 4/5
It’s about to get crazy up in here. Three times crazy, that is. Okay, that sucked. Anyway, “Flowamatic 9” from 3x Krazy is one of my other favorite songs from this album. Sick beat, ill rhymes, and not a bad chorus from Suga-T of The Click. What I find weird is that 3x Krazy had named one of their compilations “Flowamatic 9” and did not include this song. Seriously, this should have been included. 5/5
Now we slow things down with another R&B song on this album. “Ain’t No Fun” from the late Dino from the group H-Town has a sexual type of feel to it that could probably get people in the mood, but the song’s subject matter left more to be desired. It’s not much different than Snoop Dogg’s “Ain’t No Fun (If The Homies Can’t Have None),” except it’s R&B, not rap. The beat and the vocals weren’t bad at all, as it does set the mood, but the subject matter made the song lose some points. 2.5/5
Now we’re back to that hardcore gangsta shit. “Rivals” is a song from a short-lived super-group called Facemob, that has Scarface as one of the top members, along with somewhat-known artists like DMG and Devin The Dude. Now I am familiar with Devin The Dude to some degree, but in hindsight it seemed that he was out of his element trying to be a gangsta rapper. The worst part of this song is probably the female rapper 350, but I could go on about this more on their album, “The Other Side of the Law,” which I also own and may review in the future. I have to hand it to Devin for trying and DMG had a good verse on this song. Scarface mainly had the chorus to work with, so it was mainly just to have the rest of the group shine. One of my least favorite songs on this album, but not terrible. 2.5/5
“War’s On” is from a little-known group called The Almighty RSO, and better-known group called Mobb Deep. Now I will say that I am familiar with ONE of the members of RSO, and that is Raydog aka Benzino, who was mainly known for initiating a beef with Eminem back in the early-2000s, but that’s neither here nor there. Back to the song. One thing to know is that the credit may say Mobb Deep as part of the song, it’s mainly Prodigy who has a verse. However, Havoc produced this song, so it’s still a song that involved both members. Now as for the verses in this song, the only one that stood out the most was Prodigy’s verse. Benzino (I am mainly calling him this as he was mostly known by this name) was never a great rapper and he didn’t really have a great verse either, but it was not horrible. The other RSO members were okay at best. 3/5, mainly for Mobb Deep’s contribution.
Former N.W.A. member MC Ren dropped his contribution to the soundtrack with “Who Wanna Be The Villain.” The beat is a little different from what has been heard here so far, as it has more of a scary/creepy vibe to it. Ren had always been the most underrated members of the legendary group, and he should have gotten more exposure. This song shows that he was lyrically gifted. 4/5
Now for one of my other top favorite songs on here. Spice 1 kicks dope verses in his song “Slugs,” which doesn’t have anything to do with a certain creature I will tell you that. One of the parts that I like in this song is when it pays homage to “Slippin’ Into Darkness” from War. This song reminds me of a few songs from his album “1990-Sick” which came out months before this soundtrack did. 5/5
Second to the last song and we get one from a legend in the game, the one and only Ice-T. However, “How Does It Feel” is not one of his strongest songs. That does not mean it was bad. It could have been better. I see that it’s one of those “dirty raps” so it has sexual lyrics. It has a smooth beat, and Ice delivered on the lyrics a bit, but part of it still feels weak in some areas. 3/5
The soundtrack closed out with “Good Stuff” from Smooth. This is an R&B song, by the way. The song is sort of typical with Smooth singing and talking about she needs passion and a man’s touch and all that stuff. I liked the beat, and Smooth didn’t have bad verses, but the talking parts were a weak point in the song and it overshadowed everything else. It could have been a lot better. 2/5
Does this album still hold up? I will say that this was not a top-to-bottom great album, but there were hits than misses on here. I will say that out of the R&B tracks on here, only one was actually good, another could have been better even though it had some moments, while the last one just was not great at all. As for the rap tracks, a lot of them were good, even some of the lower-rated ones had some shining moments. I like the soundtrack, but it was not a great soundtrack by any means. I recommend it, though.
3.5/5 overall

Top Five Tracks:

  1. Inner City Blues
  2. The World Is A Ghetto
  3. Slugs
  4. Flowamatic 9
  5. Who Wanna Be The Villain
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