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Compilation Review – Irv Gotti Presents: The Murderers

Year of Release: 2000

Record Label: Murder Inc./Def Jam Records

It is now February and I have been planning on doing a series of album reviews related to Murder Inc. At the moment I mainly have the compilations of the label, like The Murderers, The Inc and The Remixes. I don’t have a lot of Ja Rule albums. I have Ashanti albums, although while I might do R&B albums in the future, I am not thinking about doing them for my special of The Inc. My mind may change. I also don’t have any of Lloyd’s albums, so that can’t be done soon either. The only other album that I have is the soundtrack to The Fast and The Furious but I am saving that for my marathon of the Fast & Furious soundtracks come March through April in honor of The Fate of The Furious and I will cop the soundtrack album of that and review it.

Anyway, compilations from record labels are a rather common thing in the hip-hop world. A lot of the time the labels put out these compilation albums in order to have a lot of their lineup shine, to show the world what some of these artists are made of. Sure, you can have albums from said artists from the label but it takes a lot of time and money to see if they are marketable enough to release them. Some get released, and some others don’t. Of course, a good example in the rap world that had an extensive lineup of artists and albums coming out almost every week is No Limit Records, but that is a subject for another day. I am going to talk about the first compilation album that Murder Inc. Records had released called “Irv Gotti Presents: The Murderers.”

According to a review from AllMusic.com, The Murderers (Or Murder Inc) was initially supposed to be a project regarding a supergroup consisting of Ja Rule, Jay-Z and DMX. Unfortunately there had been some issues along the way and the project never really got past its preliminary stages. In the end, what was released was a compilation of tracks put out by rappers on the Murder Inc. label, such as Ja Rule, Tah Murdah (Later known as Caddillac Tah), Black Child, Chris Black, 01, Vita, etc. That’s not a bad thing, however.

For the most of this compilation, it consists of tracks with multiple artists. There are a lot of collaborative songs on here, and very little solo songs to be found. When talking about the solo efforts, one song that stands out in different ways probably has to be “Vita, Vita, Vita” from, well, Vita. I had never doubted Vita’s efforts as a rapper as she has done a lot of good verses in many songs that she has been in. I also found it to be a shame that her solo debut, “La Dolce Vita” was shelved. Anyway, back to the song. Her verses on this track are actually solid, but what docks points from it were the repetitive chorus and the introductory hooks from Ja, Tah and Black Child that appeared prior to a verse. It was mostly average in my opinion. Then you also have a song from DMX on here called “Tales From The Darkside,” which I sort of wondered why because X was not a part of the label (Though he did collaborate with Ja at that point). Regarding the song itself, it actually feels like a lost entry in DMX’s “Damien” saga. The beat actually has a sinister vibe to it and X even did his “Damien” voice at some moments. Anyway, it’s an exceptional listen, so I can’t complain about a DMX track being on this compilation.

As far as other solo tracks go, Black Child had a couple of them, one of which had a laidback beat. Tah Murdah did a decent job in his song, “Get It Right.”

The last solo track that was featured on here happened to have been one of three songs that had appeared on soundtracks to movies that came out prior to this album’s release. “How Many Wanna Die” from Ja had appeared on the soundtrack to 1999’s Light It Up. The song has a rather gritty beat and Ja doing more singing-like rapping in this song. Not like how he did R&B/Pop-like songs like he did after this, but more in the style of how Bone Thugs did some songs.

The other two songs that had initially appeared on movie soundtrack albums were “Somebody’s Gonna Die Tonight” from Dave Bing and Lil’ Mo and “We Murderers Baby” from Ja and Vita, having appeared on the soundtracks to Romeo Must Die and Next Friday, respectively. “Somebody’s Gonna Die Tonight” is actually one of my favorite songs on here as Dave Bing provided some raw rhymes in the song, while Lil’ Mo did a good job singing the chorus. While “We Murderers Baby” is a decent duet from Ja and Vita.

The rest of the album consists of collaborative efforts. Some of the tracks are decent, but the best ones are probably “We Don’t Give a Fuck” and the “Holla Holla Remix.” The latter has a good lineup ranging from Ja to Busta Rhymes and Jay-Z, with each rapper giving it their all in the track. While “We Don’t Give a Fuck” used a sample from Bill Conti’s “Gonna Fly Now,” as in the same song from the Rocky movies. The use of that sample can really get you pumped up, even if it is not the song it sampled.

Irv Gotti definitely had a lot of influence on this album, according to the liner notes. He had contributed a lot to the production of this album. I can’t complain about it because a lot of the beats were actually good. My least favorite song on here was “If You Were My Bitch,” mostly because of the chorus. I also must add that the beat wasn’t done by Gotti, but it was from Damizza. The song had a good beat, however.

One other thing I noticed is that while this album had a total of 25 tracks on here, some of the tracks included filler skits that really didn’t need to be on there. I usually don’t have a problem with skits on albums, but part of me believed that it was to fill up the whole disc.

I have to hand it to Murder Inc for putting out a decent compilation when the label was getting its start. Many of the songs involved the same people, but it seemed like it was a group effort for everyone to do their thing, making a little room for a few solo joints here and there. Also, Irv Gotti did a good job on the production. So this album gets a pass from me.

Next up: Irv Gotti Presents: The Inc.

Top 5 Tracks:

  1. We Don’t Give a Fuck
  2. Somebody’s Gonna Die Tonight
  3. Shit Gets Ugly
  4. Holla Holla Remix
  5. Tales From The Darkside
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Album Review: Snoop Dogg presents Christmas In Tha Dogghouse

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Year: 2008

Label: Doggystyle Records

Here I am in my final post for my holiday special, well, for this year, anyway. I had trouble finding another Christmas rap album to do, and then I bought this album because I was curious about it.

Up until sometime this year, I had no knowledge about this compilation. While I had planned on writing about Christmas on Death Row and High Fo’ Xmas for a long time, I had trouble finding something another Christmas hip-hop album. Initially I had thought about buying the Christmas Rap compilation, which also included the holiday classic, “Christmas in Hollis” from Run-DMC, but I didn’t get around to it. I realize that there are more Christmas albums done by rappers out there, so I could probably do those in the years to come. I wouldn’t mind throwing in a few Christmas albums from R&B artists.

Anyway, regarding this album, I will say that it’s kind of odd to listen to, especially during the holidays. I had said that “High Fo’ Xmas” is funny to listen to considering its content and how most of the songs had very little to talk about regarding Christmas, but this album actually took the cake in being an odd listen. For example, the song “A Gift that Keeps on Giving” from Damani felt like a song that belonged somewhere else. While holiday references were made, the flow sounded like he wanted to use that for a totally different song and the chorus repeated itself numerous times towards the end. It almost felt like it had skipped multiple times to the point where it felt like it wouldn’t end.

Also, “A Very Special Christmas” felt like the singer, Uncle Chucc, didn’t put a lot of effort into his vocal performance. It could have been better than it actually was.

In fact, many of the songs on this album left a lot more to be desired. I didn’t have a problem with the beats that were used in a few of the songs, as “My Mama Trippin on Christmas” had a nice beat to go with the holiday feel, but the subject matter in the lyrics didn’t go with the flow of the song. The flow of the rapping went with the beat better than the lyrics, however.

The parts that actually shined on this album were done by the veterans in Snoop, Kurupt, Daz, Lil 1/2 Dead and The Twinz. Nothing against the other artists, but I actually found more enjoyment in “This Christmas” from Tha Dogg Pound as well as “Just Like Xmas” from Lil 1/2 Dead and The Twinz. “Look Out” was another one that stood out as it included a few of the aforementioned veterans, as well as a good chorus from Nate Dogg (RIP). Snoop, Daz and Kurupt all had good verses in the song. “Xmas Trees” from Kurupt is actually a fun track to listen to, especially with a few references to weed. It lit up the album more, no pun intended.

The song “When Was Jesus Born?” from Lil Gee is a song I can give an A for effort, too, but it still could have been better. The vocals reminded me a little bit of T-Pain. The beat was decent, though, and I have to say that the subject matter really captured the Christmas spirit in the religious sense.

Back to when I talked about the songs from Damani, it was not his fault that the songs weren’t great. In fact I am curious about checking out more of his stuff in the future because he had shown promise as a rapper and I know he was also affiliated with Snoop. But the songs he did weren’t exactly great as he was not given decent content to work with.

In spite of a few good things that I said about this album, I really did not care for it. I don’t know if I will find myself jamming to this in the Christmases to come, at least not like Christmas on Death Row. I actually enjoyed that album and High Fo’ Xmas is something that I would put on if I am bored or something around the holiday season. I don’t recommend this album, but it’s a downloadable album so I would only recommend a handful of tracks. It really was not a good album in my opinion.

Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Look Out
  2. This Christmas
  3. Twas The Night Before Christmas
  4. Xmas Trees
  5. Just Like Xmas
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Album Review: West Coast Bad Boyz – High Fo’ Xmas

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Year: 1994

Label: No Limit Records/Solar Music Group

Track Listing:

  1. High Fo’ Xmas
  2. Intro
  3. Lock Up Fo’ Xmas
  4. Talk
  5. Jacking Fo Da Holidays
  6. Chillin’ N Da Game
  7. Ghetto Nite
  8. Christmas In Da Ghetto
  9. Hood Carols
  10. Rev. Do Wrong Xmas Party
  11. No Limit Party

So now I am continuing with my Christmas/holiday special. I held on to my promise to do the compilation of “High Fo’ Xmas” from West Coast Bad Boyz. This is a No Limit album, by the way, and unlike “Christmas On Death Row,” this isn’t a traditional holiday album and I will admit that I bought this album as kind of a counter to the Death Row album. I saw that this wasn’t a family-friendly Christmas album to begin with.

If anything I bought this as a joke on my part. It wouldn’t be the first time that I heard some Christmas rap song that isn’t really appropriate to listen to. “Merry Muthaphuckkin Xmas” from Eazy-E is a rather humorous song that spoofs Christmas songs. Some songs on here are similar to that, and then you also have songs that didn’t need to be on this album to begin with.

I will note that this album came out in the days when No Limit still represented the West Coast, particularly the Bay Area. This was before they became a more south-based label when they had those gaudy Pen & Pixel album covers. Hence why this was a West Coast Bad Boyz compilation.

One thing that really got me about this album was that it had the intro as the second track, when the intro is often the first track of the album.

Anyway, a lot of the tracks on this album varied and mentioned Christmas and the holidays in passing, but there weren’t that many tracks that were about Christmas. For example, the opening track, which was also the title track, talks about getting high around the holidays in one of the verses, but then the rest has little reference to the holidays. Not a bad track. It has a laid-back beat that has the feel of a stoner song. Hence the name.

“Lock Up Fo Xmas” was similar in that it talked about being locked up during Christmastime but then went into the struggles of being locked up. King George, a rapper who I am really unfamiliar with, actually had good verses in this song. So this was actually a decent track. I will say the same thing, or maybe that this song was better, when thinking of “Jacking Fo Da Holidays,” as that song used a lot of beats from different songs ranging from “Thuggish Ruggish Bone” from Bone Thugs to “Funkdafied” from Da Brat. There were a lot of beats used on this song to name, and it was funny to hear P try to rap some of the verses similar to the rappers from each respective song.

One song that drew my attention prior to buying this album was “Christmas in da Ghetto” and it’s kind of a strange track to listen to as there is some transition in beats when listening to the chorus and the verses. One minute you would hear the chorus, which is similar to “Deck The Halls,” and then when you hear the verses from C-Murder and Master P, it has a totally different beat. I will add that when I listened to one verse from C-Murder, it reminded me of a song from RBL Posse, particularly from their album, “A Lesson To Be Learned.”

“Rev. Do Wrong Xmas Party” is another decent track from other No Limit rappers during that time, Big Ed (RIP), Lil Ric, and Dangerous Dame.

Keeping with the Christmas theme that this album has, a couple of interludes had different versions of traditional Christmas carols, like “Ghetto Nite” was a different take on “Silent Night.” While the “Hood Carols” was Master P singing his own rendition of “The 12 Days of Christmas.” It’s actually rather humorous.

Remember when I said that there were tracks that felt like they belonged somewhere else? Well, those two songs are “Chillin’ in Da Game” and “No Limit Party,” which the latter is a remix. They have absolutely nothing to do with Christmas, but they are decent tracks nonetheless. I now wonder where I could find the original version to “No Limit Party.”

The only thing that I have an issue with about this album is that it really didn’t have the feel of a gangsta rap Christmas album. Sure, there were songs that talked about getting high, the drug game or hard time around the holidays, but take that part away and it really wouldn’t have made a difference. It’s still a decent compilation, though. I plan to do other No Limit albums in the future and I know that there are a lot out there.

Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Jacking Fo Da Holidays
  2. Christmas In Da Ghetto
  3. Lock Up Fo Xmas
  4. High Fo’ Xmas
  5. Rev. Do Wrong Xmas Party
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Album Review: Christmas on Death Row

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Year: 1996

Label: Death Row Records/Interscope Records

Track Listing:

  1. Santa Claus Goes Straight To The Ghetto – Snoop Dogg, Nate Dogg, Daz Dillinger, Bad Azz, and Tray Deee
  2. Christmas Song – Danny Boy
  3. I Wish – Tha Dogg Pound
  4. Silver Bells – Michel’le
  5. Peaceful Christmas – Danny Boy
  6. Christmas in the Ghetto – O.F.T.B. (Operation From The Bottom)
  7. Silent Night – B.G.O.T.I., 6 Feet Deep, and Guess
  8. Be Thankful – Nate Dogg feat. Butch Cassidy
  9. On This Glorious Day – 816
  10. Frosty The Snowman – 6 Feet Deep
  11. O Holy Night – B.G.O.T.I.
  12. Party 4 Da Homies – Sean Barney Thomas feat. J-Flexx
  13. White Christmas – Guess
  14. This Christmas – Danny Boy
  15. Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas – 6 Feet Deep
  16. Christmas Everyday – Guess

It is now December and before I had started this blog, I had planned on doing a review on “Christmas on Death Row,” which was, as you would guess, a Christmas-themed album released by Death Row Records. Not just that, I just realized that today was the 20-year anniversary since its release, so what better way than to kick off this month than to review this album, especially on its anniversary?

Before I get into the album, let me just give some input on the deal regarding this album. Regarding the Death Row label, anybody who had listened to rap at any point in their lives would know what the contents of the music from this label consisted of, whether they involved drugs, violence, sex, misogyny, you get the picture. I will admit that when I was 10 years old, when I had heard about a Christmas album from Death Row coming out, I chuckled a bit. It just seemed a bit off because of what I was used to hearing from them, whether it was from Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, 2Pac, etc. Hell, the album refreshed my memory about four or five years later when Death Row started re-releasing their albums and all the artworks had said “Digitally Remastered” on the cover. However, being that I was a teen then, I remember going on Amazon and looking at the listing and seeing a lot of negative feedback for this album. I was a naive kid then so I assumed that the album would suck. Then came when I reached my 20’s and the curiosity kicked in again.

I looked up the album again and finally listened to some samples and thought “Hey, maybe I would give this a shot.” I later bought it online and noticed that the copy that I got was the original 1996 release. Which I think was better considering how I liked on the “Parental Advisory” label, it had a red bow on top of it, unlike the 2001 re-release. Also, I will get to the part about the PA label.

Anyway, being that a lot of people would assume that this is a rap album that has people rapping about Christmas mixed in with violent content and other no-so-family friendly content, I decided that I would do the rap songs first before I go into anything else.

The song that kicked off this album was “Santa Claus Goes Straight To The Ghetto” from Snoop, Daz, Bad Azz, Nate Dogg, and Tray Deee. It is an interesting song considering how each guy talked about their experiences around Christmas time and as always, Nate Dogg (RIP) delivered a solid hook to the song. Plus, the song had a laid-back beat as it sampled “Do Your Thing” from the late Isaac Hayes. It’s a good song that was accompanied with an even better video. You just have to see it to believe it.

The thing that got me about “I Wish” from Tha Dogg Pound were the lyrics from Daz and Kurupt about how they wish they had love around the holidays. It was refreshing to hear them in a vulnerable state talking about how it was hard for them around the holidays. It had a good beat to go with it, produced by Daz, and also a chorus from a female singer, who I have trouble identifying.

And finally, in regards to the rap tracks of the album, we get to “Christmas in the Ghetto” from O.F.T.B.. I am mostly unfamiliar with these guys as I only know their songs from this album, the “Above The Rim” soundtrack, the “Gridlock’d” soundtrack, and the “Gang Related” soundtrack. I know that they had an album before signing with Death Row and later an album album on Death Row that was released way after the label’s heyday (When the label was seized by Wideawake and released a lot of their unreleased albums), both of which I may check out sometime down the line. Anyway, regarding this track, I have to give these guys credit for rapping about how Christmas was hard for them in the ghetto, but it really didn’t need the beat for the song as it was best suited for any other song. It’s one of my least favorite songs from the album, despite the lyrics and content, both of which also could have been better. Also, believe it or not, this song was the reason that this album was slapped with the Parental Advisory label. Yes, that is right, this song actually had profanity on there. Believe it or not, “Santa Claus Goes Straight To The Ghetto” and “I Wish” had no profanity in them at all. All three songs had minor drug references as they mentioned weed here and there, but that was about it, but the other songs were more appropriate to listen to around people.

That is about it for the rap tracks (Well, there is one other track with a rap verse that I will get to). What? You thought that this would be all rap? Well, that is not the case, because Death Row also had a lot of R&B acts on the label. That’s right, the majority of the album is R&B, which is not a bad thing. In fact, R&B works better for an album like this. First, I will touch on the original tracks before I touch on the traditional tracks.

“Peaceful Christmas” is one of three songs that Danny Boy had done for this album. This is actually a more original track as it isn’t one of those Christmas songs that you hear all the time during the holidays. In fact, some of the lyrics made reference to a few traditional Christmas songs. Danny Boy shined in this track with his soothing vocals, but regarding the beat of the song it gives off a rather dated feel. This album was released in the 1990’s, so it had a 90’s R&B feel. The beat reminded me a bit of “Pretty Brown Eyes” from Mint Condition. If you can look past that, the song is solid.

“Be Thankful,” on the other hand, is a very relaxing song to hear from Nate Dogg, along with Butch Cassidy, who provided additional vocals. Nate’s vocals didn’t come in until 30 seconds into the track as it started with an instrumental intro. The soulful vocals were strong with the two singers and the song’s message really stands out too. It had a nice soothing beat, too.

I was unsure if “On This Glorious Day” was a traditional track, but it seemed like it wasn’t as it had more of a holiday feel than it a religious feel from a more common song of the same name. This song was from 816, which I suppose was an R&B group on Tha Row at the time but never came out with anything new. The thing that I also must point out is that the intro to this song was also used in the intro bit for the video to “Santa Claus Goes Straight To The Ghetto.” Anyway, I have to say that this is actually a solid track. The beat and the lyrics can really get you in the mood for Christmas. It’s actually a standout, in my opinion.

However, the last of the original R&B tracks left a lot more to be desired with “Party 4 Da Homies” from Sean Barney Thomas. The beat was a little too fast-paced and a bit out of place, too. It was mostly a song about setting up a Christmas party with the guys and having a bunch of women over. J-Flexx provided the rap verse for this song, which was also a bit mixed in some areas, as in he rapped about partying in the majority and then at the end said to be thankful for what you have in life. I get that the final bit of the rap verse was to get people in the spirit, but it didn’t help. Also, the chorus was rather repetitive. This song was actually another one on here that I didn’t care for.

The rest of the album had covers of traditional Christmas songs. The main thing that I noticed is that a lot of them were done by the same artists. What I mean is that you had multiple songs by one artist, and other songs done by a group, and then it happened with another few.

“Silent Night” featured an ensemble of B.G.O.T.I. (Which stood for “Bad Girlz of The Industry), 6 Feet Deep, and Guess. I have no idea who 6 Feet Deep and Guess are, but I mostly know of B.G.O.T.I. from their contributions to the “Gridlock’d” and “Gang Related” soundtracks. That is about it. Anyway, this version actually had a gospel-like feel to it. I can’t complain about the vocals from the singers on this song, but I think it was a little too long. That was about it in terms of complaints. But it’s still good. Also, this song had a video to go with it.

As for the other covers, I wasn’t too big on 6 Feet Deep’s version “Frosty The Snowman” as it had the feel of a boy band covering it, but I’ll listen to it if it comes on. The same could be said about “White Christmas” from Guess, which feels dated now as it has that 90’s R&B feel. It had a unique spin on it, but it’s not too bad.

However, “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” from 6 Feet Deep was actually a pretty good song from them, but it did not need the interlude in the middle of the song with one of the singers talking about the group. So that docked a few points from the song.

Guess’s version of the Smokey Robinson song, “Christmas Everyday” actually surprised me a bit when I first heard it. It definitely has a more urbanized touch to it and the singers really did a good job in trying to do Robinson’s vocal style in it. I cannot complain about this one.

The other two Danny Boy tracks, “The Christmas Song” and “This Christmas,” were more of a bright spot as he had provided soothing vocals and both songs had quite a jazzy beat to them. Both songs stood out and I will also say the same thing about “O Holy Night” from B.G.O.T.I.. Those ladies really gave it their all on their vocals.

Michel’le had only one track on here and that was her version of “Silver Bells,” which was pretty straightforward and she provided some great vocals like always. It was a pretty good track from her. I don’t understand why she didn’t have any other songs on here.

Overall, I have to give Death Row credit for trying to do a holiday album. This album is not bad, by any means. It’s actually decent, even though there are a couple of songs that I did not like, and a few that I wasn’t crazy about but would still listen to. It’s definitely not a gangsta rap album like one would think. It’s kind of funny to see the Death Row logo decked out in Santa gear on the album cover. It also must be noted that with the exception of “Christmas In The Ghetto,” this album is appropriate to listen to around people. So don’t be afraid to blast it while doing stuff (Though skip that track if you must, otherwise just burn a copy without that song). Also, Christmas albums from hip-hop labels are nothing new. In fact, I will review “High Fo’ Xmas” very soon, as in West Coast Bad Boyz. Stay tuned.

Also, check out the artwork that was used on the inside of the booklet. It’s a nice touch how the artist put the wings and halo on Tupac, because this album was released after he was killed. I wonder if he hadn’t died if he would have contributed to it.

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Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Santa Claus Goes Straight To The Ghetto
  2. I Wish
  3. Be Thankful
  4. On This Glorious Day
  5. Silver Bells
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Album Review: X-Raided – Xorcist

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Year: 1995

Label: Black Market Records

Track Listing:

  1. Open Tha Casket
  2. I Ain’t Dead Yet
  3. Recognize (Feat. Babe Reg & Lunasicc)
  4. Body Count (Feat. Da Misses)
  5. Collect Call
  6. Check Your Bitch
  7. Blaze Up
  8. Wanna Get High? (Feat. Lunasicc)
  9. Unxplainable
  10. Deuce-5 To Life
  11. Unfukwitable (Feat. Da Misses & Babe Reg)
  12. Liquor, N***z & Triggaz (Feat. Brotha Lynch Hung & Sicx)
  13. Done Deal (Feat. Da Misses)
  14. Brainz
  15. Witta Mask On (Feat. Da Misses, Killa Hoe, Chopah & Lunasicc)
  16. Mo Brainz

When looking at underground rappers from certain areas, more often than not they become famous among some circles. What is odd is that while I am a native of Sacramento, Calif., I remember some people I know tell me that they are familiar with not-so-big names from various parts of the United States, or even the world for that matter. For example, a friend of my uncle’s had served in the military and was told that he knew some fellow marines whom known about Sacramento rappers, only to find out that they weren’t from California, let alone Sacramento. It could be said that I mostly know of X-Raided because he is from Sactown himself, and also the fact that I remember looking at my uncle’s rap CD collection at the tender young age of 9 and noticing a name I have never heard of before. A cousin of mine told me that he is from Sacramento, which made me realize that music acts come from all over, but I was still a naive boy at the time.

For years I was curious about this rapper, even though I was a little familiar with other rappers from my area like C-Bo, Brotha Lynch Hung, First Degree The DE, etc., but what got me is the name and the artwork of the album. I tested out a sample on the internet sometime later, like in 2000 or something, and from what I had heard, the voice of X-Raided sounded in low quality in contrast to how the beat sounded, and I was confused why he sounded a bit robotic. That is until I was told by my cousin about why it sounded that way.

Before I go into critiquing this album, I will go into some of the background of this album. Anerae Brown, better known as X-Raided, was in prison around the time that this album was produced. I am not going to go into the details of what happened, as the information can be found all over the internet, but with him incarcerated, what could be explained about the low quality of his voice on the songs is the fact that he recorded his verses through a prison phone and the production team implemented his verses into the songs during the production of the album. However, that does not mean the quality in his verses changed because of the sound.

The album kicks off with an introductory skit called “Open Tha Casket” that has someone singing in the background and another person talking, giving a shout-out to those who aren’t living anymore and mentioning X-Raided, which goes right into the first album called “I Ain’t Dead Yet.” X’s verses were pretty good, and the beat was actually a different than how the beat for the intro was. I also chuckled when he mentioned a street name in one of the verses because I am very familiar with that area. The quality of his verses is still poor, but this is only the first song and while quality in the verses could have been a lot better, it’s still a good track. 4/5

The next track “Recognize” is the first feature guest artists on here. The beat and the production comes hard and X’s verses come hard, too. Lunasicc and Baby Reg don’t provide any verses, but rather hooks and bridges. They did a good job on this song. One of the best tracks on this album. 5/5

When you listen to “Body Count,” chances are you will start bobbing your head because the beat is bangin’. I like how the chorus uses a line from another X-Raided song, as well as a clip from a Brotha Lynch Hung song. Da Misses also sounded decent on this song, but I don’t really think she needed two verses when X only had one. I sometimes wonder what happened to her and whether she had any albums. She sure can spit. 5/5

Then came with another skit called “Collect Call.” I didn’t really see much point in it, except that it was just to show that he called from the penitentiary.

“Check Your Bitch” might sound like an offensive track on the surface, but if you listen to the lyrics, it seems like X told a story with his lyrics, about some of the shit he got into when he got involved with a woman and what he had to face. The beat was nice, too. It’s a decent track. 4/5

I won’t critique the next track as it’s another skit, but I will critique the next song as it does not take long to get to it, although the skit is precursor to the next song.

And now for something different. “Wanna Get High?” is not like the other songs as X did not rap on this. In fact, the only contribution he had to this song is that he WROTE it as Lunasicc actually SANG on this track. Luni doesn’t have a bad singing voice, actually. Not to mention the beat was sick, and the lyrics are nothing more than just about smoking  weed. It’s a good song to smoke to. Different than the others, but that is not a bad thing. 3.5/5

Another skit after this, and I never saw what the deal was. I guess it was “unxplainable.”

This next song happens to be one of the deepest tracks on this album. “Deuce-5 To Life” is about X’s issues with the law and how he ended up in the pen. The lyrics really told a story with this one. I also must add that I remember in the CD booklet for this song that the lyrics for this were written on one of the pages. Another one of the best songs on this album. 5/5

X-Raided came hard as always in “Unfukwitable.” I must add that I now know where the chorus for “Recognize” came from, and it was from this song. This song’s chorus got a little repetitive after a while. Da Misses also appeared on this song and had a decent verse. Good song, but also a little repetitive. 4/5

“Liquor, N***z and Triggaz” is another standout track on this album. X has some guests on here, Brotha Lynch Hung and Sicx. They only provided the chorus on here. All three rappers delivered on this track. 5/5

I must say that “Done Deal” is like “Wanna Get High?” in that X did not appear on the song at all. This is actually a solo song from Da Misses. The beat was actually pretty mellow and I liked the synthesized voice in the chorus. Not a bad song, but it’s far from great. 3/5

Okay, right here I am going to have to do the final three tracks as a whole. The two interludes actually go with the song. They are from the movie “Return of the Living Dead.” That was some creepy shit, and then there’s the song, “Witta Mask On.” X delivered some raw lyrics. My favorite part is when he mentioned some horror movies like “Friday The 13th” and “Hellraiser.” It sounded like some straight horror movie shit right here. And add to that, we had verses from Da Misses, Chopah and Lunasicc, and also a chorus from Killa Hoe, along with Da Misses. Out of the guest appearances, I would have to say that Lunasicc delivered some of the hardest lyrics in his verse. That is not to say that Da Misses and Chopah didn’t have bad rhymes, because they actually did a good job in their verses. One of the best songs on this album. 5/5

Despite the low quality in X-Raided’s verses songs on this album, he still delivered some raw and hardcore rhymes on this album. You have to hand it to him for still recording an album while still in the joint, although I must say that he recorded more albums while he was still in prison, but the quality was much better as he didn’t use the phone in the other ones. The guest appearances were also good. I have to say that this album was great in regards to effort made in spite of the weaknesses in the verses, and also overall quality. Check this album out. It still holds up to this day. 5/5

Top Five Tracks:

  1. Deuce-5 To Life
  2. Witta Mask On
  3. Recognize
  4. Liquor, N***z and Triggaz
  5. Check Your Bitch
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