Rap Movie Reviews

Rap Movie Review – Superfly

Year of Release: 2018

Production Company: Columbia Pictures/Silver Pictures

Remakes are not a new concept in cinema, despite what some people may believe, not to mention that when a remake is being made, most movie fans go up in flames because of it. Of course, with them being all the rage in this day and age, it should not be much of a shock that a 1972 Blaxploitation film called Superfly was going to be remade, even though I personally did not see something like this coming.

This new film followed a similar plot to the original in that Youngblood Priest, played by Trevor Martin, is a well-known drug dealer who wants to do one last deal before leaving the game. Of course, certain things prevent that, otherwise we wouldn’t have a movie. He has several conflicts along the way, such as a rival dealer and his gang, as well as the right-hand man who had it in for Priest from the start. Other conflicts involve a Mexican drug dealer, Priest’s mentor, and of course, crooked cops. It is basically what you would see in a movie about drug dealing and gangs, so it’s really nothing that you have not seen before.

So what did this new take on the 1972 film have to offer? One thing that is inevitable is that people are likely going to compare and contrast, especially if the movie is 46 years old. There is no escaping it, but really, this film has its own identity, despite having a similar plot and the main character shares his name with the protagonist of the original. The movie itself, however, is set in the modern world. This movie was directed by Canadian-born Director X, whose real name is Julien Christian Lutz, who is also a music video director. A lot of this movie was shot like a modern rap video with guy’s sporting bling and women wearing as little as possible. Not to mention that some action sequences had some slow-motion effects, whether it was from a hand-to-hand fight scene or a high-speed chase sequence. Another thing that this film differed from the original is that it had more of hip-hop/gangsta-style flavor to it, but that didn’t mean that there were no callbacks to the original, as some sequences had Curtis Mayfield’s songs like “Pusher Man” and of course, “Superfly” from the original film. But this time around, because Future had produced this film, he also had a hand in the production of the soundtrack and it showed as a lot of his songs were played.

Trevor Martin did a decent job playing the role of Priest. He mostly played him as a calm-type who kept his head in all situations, even in situations that were more for one to handle. Jason Mitchell, whom had portrayed Eazy-E in Straight Outta Compton, as well as appeared in 2016’s Keanu and Kong: Skull Island, stole a lot of scenes that he was in as Eddie, Priest’s right-hand man. He had brought a little comic relief into the film, even though it was predominately serious. Another standout performance was from Jennifer Morrison, who played crooked Detective Mason. She had quite an odious aura about her, enough that you wanted to see something happen to her in the end. I will say the same thing about Brian Durkin, who played an even bigger jerk of a crooked cop, Detective Franklin. Also, I was surprised to see appearances from Rick Ross and Big Boi, who played the mayor of Atlanta, where this film was set.

There were some sequences that stood out for different reasons beyond getting a good thrill from the action, or getting a laugh from a funny moment. For example, one sequence had Priest visiting his mentor Scatter, played by Michael Kenneth Williams, who was running a martial arts school. The two engaged in a friendly sparring session, while talking about taking chances and trying to get out of the drug game. Of course, not without using some martial arts techniques in the process, which ended with Scatter putting Priest in an armbar. Another sequence that stood out was the gratuitous sex sequence, when Priest was taking a shower and his two girlfriends get in there with him and you get the idea. So there was a threesome sequence, for no other reason than just some fanservice. Not to mention a tackle on racial issues at the end of the car chase scene. It almost seemed that some scenes were added in as a subtle homage to the old Blaxploitation films from the 1970’s. I will admit, I have not seen enough of them, but I have seen some, including the 1972 Superfly.

Another thing that I must add is that it has been years since I have watched original film. I am also aware that there were sequels, one being Superfly TNT from 1973, and The Return of Superfly from 1990, which had a different actor playing the protagonist that time around than Ron O’Neal when he was in the original two films. Maybe just for kicks one day, I might do reviews on them.

The thing about this film is that it is a decent way to pass the time, if you’re going in expecting a bunch of cliches from crime films involving gangsters and drug dealers. It is not that good of a movie, but I would give it some credit where credit is due as the performances were good, and the story was actually decent.

3.5/5

P.S. I may do a review on the soundtrack. I just need to get my hands on it first.

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Rap Movie Review – The Man With The Iron Fists 2

Year of Release: 2015

Film Studio: Universal Pictures/Arcade Pictures/Strike Entertainment

In the past, when I saw that there was a sequel of The Man With The Iron Fists that was made, I was baffled and not baffled at the same time. It wasn’t until recently that I found out how the first film did in its theatrical run. However, for it to have green-lit a sequel, I could only guess that a lot of units of the DVD and/or Blu Ray sold when it came out on home video. That, and maybe RZA also wrote a screenplay for the film which then got Universal to make it happen.

Like the first film, RZA had more than just a couple of credits as he yet again starred in it, as well as co-wrote the screenplay, and composed the film’s score. He also had an executive producer credit (Along with Eli Roth, the predecessor’s co-writer) and a music supervisor credit for the film, which for some reason was listed as his real name, Robert F. Diggs, whereas the other credits he was credited by his stage name. However, UNLIKE the first film, he didn’t direct it this time, as it was directed by Roel Reine, who is known for directed a lot of straight-to-video sequels. I will admit that I have seen a good amount of his films, ranging from the Death Race prequels, Hard Target 2, and sequels to a few WWE Studios films such as The Marine 2, The Condemned 2, and 12 Rounds 2: Reloaded. What can I say? I have a strange thing for straight-to-video sequels, not to mention that I am also a wrestling fan.

With a different director at the helm this time, it had a different feel to the first film. As far as any returning characters go, RZA’s character, Thaddeus, is the only one to return. Sure, there were some flashback sequences to some characters from its predecessor, but only two of them were played by the same actors. It’s a totally different story this time, too, as Thaddeus went to a different village to seek a temple to make peace with himself. He was found wounded by some villagers and then found himself in the middle of a power conflict in that same village. I will say that RZA had more of a presence this time around, despite having not been seen for a half hour after the first scene he was in.

Another thing that was different this time around were the fight sequences with some characters. It appeared that a lot of the fight scenes included some legitimate martial artists and weren’t reliant on the use of wires. But was jarring were the editing and odd camera angles during those scenes. For example, one scene had two men fighting and then there were bird’s eye camera angles and then moved close to them and then changed angles, rinse and repeat. That didn’t take away from the fact that the fighting in those scenes was good, though, just the editing and cuts were a bit distracting.

Carl Ng, who played the main villain, Master Ho, seemed like he was having a blast playing that role. It’s like he really brought his A-game to it and was committed to it. Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa did a good job in his role, too, and the twist/revelation towards the end was definitely something that I would not have expected and he is good as always. As for RZA, he didn’t do a bad job in his role. My main guess is that he was more or less swamped with a lot of his duties in the first film that he didn’t put a lot of effort into the role. He still has room for improvement as an actor, but he did a better job in this film (I didn’t mind him in Brick Mansions, looking back).

RZA also handled the score pretty well. I have always admired him as a producer and I think he should do film scores a lot more. But also like in the first film, there were some rap songs played in some scenes. Now I liked what I had heard, but the song just felt out of place and was just too anachronistic for this.

I must say that I found myself enjoying this film more than I thought that I would. I even enjoyed it more than the first film. A lot of the action scenes were actually decent, especially the big climax. As said before, the fight scenes could have been better without the odd edits and camera angles, but that’s about as far as I could go in regards to the flaws. I wonder now if RZA is planning to do a third film. Only time will tell.

3.5/5

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Rap Movie Review – The Man With The Iron Fists

Year of Release: 2012

Film Studio: Universal Pictures/Strike Entertainment/Arcade Pictures

When listening to a Wu-Tang album, it should be of no secret that RZA is a huge fan of Kung Fu flicks. It’s obvious by hearing some clips of them in some songs, especially in “Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers).” Hell, there was a Kung Fu theme for their video game, “Wu-Tang: Shaolin Style,” a game I should cover one day. RZA has made it known that he is a fan and it is obvious with this film, “The Man With The Iron Fists.”

This film was basically RZA’s pet project as he has about five different credits for this film. That’s right, he had not only directed this film, but also came up with the story outline, he co-wrote the script with Eli Roth, he composed the film’s score, and of course, he also starred in the film. That must have been tiring for him as it’s not easy to have multiple duties like that. However, the only thing that was first for him was that it was his major film directorial debut as it was not the first time he had acted or composed a score, nor was it the first time he had come up with a film idea.

In the past, there was an idea that he wanted to get off the ground, which was a film adaptation of his Bobby Digital character, not to mention a trailer (or short film) was released in 2000 of it. Two years before TMWTIF came out, a short film called “Wu-Tang vs. The Golden Phoenix” had come out. It seemed like a precursor to this film as it has the same style. According to some sources, the development for this film came about not long after RZA had done the score for the “Kill Bill” films, which is probably the reason why Quentin Tarantino had his name as the presenter of the film, despite having no credits in this film at all. At some point, RZA had met Eli Roth and they had co-written the script and at some point, the script was rewritten and Roth was disappointed in the rewrite, that they had to change it up again. However, when the film was pitched to producers, they had trusted RZA to direct after having seen “Wu-Tang vs. The Golden Phoenix.”

As noted before, this was quite a step for RZA, especially having multiple credits in this film, but what about the film itself? How was the film? Well, before I get into that, I will note two things. One, I remember having a written a review of this film for my college newspaper back when it came out. I remembered I had praised the film, but so much time had passed that I was not sure where I stood with it. I gave it a lot of credit because I am a Wu-Tang fan and enjoyed some of the fight scenes, but at a certain point, I looked back and thought it was cheesy. The other thing that I must note is that for this review, I had decided to watch both the theatrical version and the unrated extended edition back-to-back to see the differences. It wouldn’t be the first time that I had watched two different cuts of a film back-to-back.

The film’s plot involved a faction, a British soldier, and some others on the hunt for gold, while a blacksmith (Played by RZA), who makes weapons for assassins and warriors, has to defend the village that is being invaded. It seems like a plot that had been done before, but I think that is what RZA was going for as it was done as a tribute to martial arts films from the 1970’s. But even with a simple story like that, it just seemed like it was all over the place.

There were some known names in this film, such as Lucy Liu, who played Madam Blossom, a madam for a brothel in the village, and Russell Crowe, who played Jack Knife, the mysterious British soldier whose presence was unknown until the end of the film. According to IMDB, Crowe had agreed to do this film in return for RZA teaching some rap lessons to a rugby team Crowe co-owns, as well as that he only worked on this film for 10 days. He must have been rather consistent in the time of shooting because he had a lot of screen-time. Actually, Liu and Crowe didn’t do a bad job in their performances in this film. Another known name, Dave Bautista, better known as Batista in WWE, as well as his portrayal of Drax in the “Guardians of the Galaxy” films, mainly played a brute in this film. He didn’t really have much to work with than just be a big, hulking brute who can turn his body into brass. But what about RZA? That is a really good question. For a guy who is supposed to be the title character, he took a backseat to a lot of the events of the film, whether it was with the villains, Crowe’s character, Liu’s character, or even Bautista’s character. Sure, he had to direct it for the most part, and he had screen-time, but he didn’t really have a lot to do, nor did he really act well in his role. It’s true that he has acting credits in his name, but he really isn’t much of an actor.

What this film shined in were the fight scenes, as a lot of the choreography was well-done for those scenes, especially the use of wires for the aerial attacks. Also the score from RZA was done well, too, as the music went well with the scenes that the tracks were used in. But what was distracting in the fight sequences was the use of CGI blood. Just looking at the blood squirting out of the wounds in those sequences can’t look any more fake than it already is. It would have been better if there were blood squibs used in those scenes to make it look more real. Also, about the music, while I loved how there was a remix of “Shame on a N****” used in a scene, as well as “Unpredictable,” it just felt slightly out of place as it was anachronistic, but then again, even some other anachronistic songs were used in some other sequences.

I have to give RZA some credit for this film as he is really passionate about martial arts films, but the end result just came out as average at best, with the cons slightly outweighing the pros. The story was not all that great and it really hard to follow what was really going on. Also, while some characters had a purpose in the plot, some of them were not really needed to drive the story. Some of the story aspects were vague. Some of the actors’ performances were fine, and with a film like this, the acting is not really essential to make it good, as this film’s selling point was the action itself. The action and the fighting were actually among the pros, but something about them was taken away with the use of CGI blood. The film didn’t hold up from my first viewing of it when I saw it in theaters, but it really was not terrible either. It didn’t deserve the praise that I gave it back then, but I didn’t mind it, either. It’s not a terrible way to spend a boring day with nothing to do.

One more thing, I am aware that there is a sequel to this film, but it’s straight-to-video. I guess RZA had some more story to tell and the film didn’t do well in theaters enough to justify a theatrical release for the sequel (It was shot on $15 million but made only $19 million). I will get to that soon. The same will be said about the soundtrack for this film.

If you want to read my original review, click here. Thank you.

5/10

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Movie Review – All Eyez on Me

Year of Release: 2017

Production Company: Summit Entertainment/Morgan Creek Productions/Program Pictures/Codeblack Films

It must be said: there is no denying that Tupac Shakur has maintained his popularity throughout the years, even more than two decades after his untimely demise. His deep-in-though lyrics really touched the minds and hearts of not just hip-hop fans, but also other people who have struggled in the things that were related to his music. It was apparent that a biopic would be made about the fallen rap star.

“All Eyez on Me” is the third rap biopic to be released theatrically, following 2009’s “Notorious” and 2015’s “Straight Outta Compton.” With the cultural impact that Pac had on the masses, there was no doubt that a biopic should be released in theaters.

However, unlike SOC, it’s sad to say that AEOM doesn’t have the best production value or even storytelling that SOC had.

The first thing that must be noted is that Demetrius Shipp Jr not only has a strong resemblance to Pac, but I have to give him credit for trying in his debut role. But I still had some issues with the film.

WARNING: There may be spoilers ahead.

The thing that was distracting about the film is that there was no real flow to the storytelling. The movie in a nutshell was mainly that Pac was interviewed by a journalist who was covering his life story. It talked about how Pac was brought up by his mother, who was a black panther and how he ended up starting off as an actor before becoming a rapper. Also, it showed a bit of his friendship with Jada Pinkett. So it talked about how he was first discovered by Digital Underground. I have to hand it to the casting director for casting the guy who played Shock G, as he looked so much like him and even had some of his mannerisms. Anyway, then it showed sequences filming certain scenes from movies like “Juice” and “Above The Rim.” I really wonder what the point of those scenes were. Yes, everyone knows that Pac was an actor as well, but I didn’t find any of that to be crucial to the story. I will say that I didn’t mind that those bits were recreated with some people playing the actors whom he shared those scenes with. I wonder if some scenes in that when he filmed “Poetic Justice,” “Gridlock’d,” and “Gang Related” were done but just left on the cutting room floor. I wonder about the actors who played Janet Jackson, Tim Roth, and Jim Belushi respectively, because the guy who was supposed to be Omar Epps looked nothing like him. The same could be said about Leon, the guy who played Pac’s character’s brother in ATR.

Another thing that I noticed was that clips of some music videos were recreated in some sequences like the video to Digital Underground’s “Same Song,” as well as “I Get Around.” Not to mention certain interviews in which every single word and mannerism were done to recreate them. As well as certain pictures that were shot, like the one with him and Faith Evans, and the infamous snapshot of him with Suge Knight right before the shooting in Vegas.

Of course, the film touched on the sexual assault charge that Pac was jailed for, as well as what led to his beef with Biggie. Speaking of whom, I noticed that the guy who played Biggie in “Notorious” was the same actor who played him in this film. I didn’t mind it, as Jamal Woolard is a rapper himself and had to use his prowess for rapping in a scene.

Then came when Pac joined Death Row Records. I am well aware of a lot of terrible and shady stuff that happened within that label, but certain sequences really made the film take it to a different level. It almost felt like I was watching a different movie. For example, during a scene at a dinner, when Suge Knight was about to confront someone, all of a sudden some ominous music started playing and then showed that he, along with other guys, started to torture this guy. In a way, I get that it was to show that Suge was a scumbag and a dangerous man, but that part made me think that I was watching a gangster movie at that moment. Same with when Suge and some other guys took some guy into a room and jumped him.

Another thing that was distracting was the guy who played Snoop Dogg. I actually wondered if Snoop lent his voice to dub the actor who played him. It sounded just like him that it could have been a dub.

Anyway, also, at that point, it talked about his romance with Kidada Jones, whom Pac was engaged to around the time of his death. That part felt shoehorned in, same with the bit of Jada Pinkett confronting Pac, which led to an alleged falling out between the two (More on this later). Same with how it showed the falling out between Snoop and Pac, and then came Vegas, and you know the rest. Oh, and I noticed that the real security footage from the casino beat-down that took place that very night was used. So it didn’t seem like he had to reenact that bit.

End Spoilers.

As I had stated before, I had no problem with Shipp’s portrayal of Tupac, as I can see that he tried his hardest to play the role. I also have no problem with some inaccuracies as I had noticed some of them in SOC. Around the time of its release, Jada Pinkett had noted on Twitter about how there was inaccuracy in the film, like how Pac read her a poem, or her having attended any of his shows. But the main problem I had is that it just jumped around from one sequence to another. It could be argued that it was because Pac was being interviewed and had stories to show and tell, but it still didn’t feel like what happened after was very consistent.

I really wonder if Lionsgate is going to put out an extended cut later on with a little more footage or at least have it edited better than what was shown in the final product. I can’t say that I liked or loved the film, but I am just curious because of so many things that I would like to see. I really wonder if there was some footage of reenactments of when he shot his other films and music videos.

Overall, I very much preferred “Straight Outta Compton.” It’s been years since I have seen “Notorious,” but I may need to revisit that one. I really can’t give this film a pass.

2/5

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Rap Movie Review – State Property 2: Blood On The Streets

Year of Release: 2005

Film Studio: Lionsgate Films/Dash Films

I never thought that I would say this, but this film is more watchable than its predecessor. There I said it. However, that still doesn’t mean that this film is without problems.

Okay, I think I am getting a little ahead of myself here. Let me start over.

If you read my review of the first film, you will see that I did not have a lot of nice things to say about that film. But because I had also planned on writing about the sequel, I told myself to suck it up and sit through it.

I had never seen any scenes from this movie prior to watching it, unlike the first film. All I can remember is seeing that the DVD artwork was the same as the cover artwork for Beanie Sigel’s “The B. Coming,” which was released around the same time as this film. I wouldn’t doubt if some of his songs from that album were even in this film.

Anyway, this film sort of picked up where the first film left off, although I will note that a lot of what was shown at the beginning didn’t make any sense because of how the first film ended. Of course, there had to be a way to explain how everything turned out in order to set up the story for this film. Basically after the prologue, it shows Beans in jail for all of what happened and he ends meeting a fellow criminal named El Pollo Loco, played by N.O.R.E., who is a gangster from Miami. The two eventually become business partners, until one screws the other and then all hell breaks loose. Not to mention that Dame gets involved in the mix, Beans’ rival in the first film.

This film is different from its predecessor in a lot of ways. One of the most noticeable differences is how this film is a lot more comical than the first one. The whole movie does not take itself seriously and a lot of scenes come off as humorous in some areas. Even with some of the predictability, the movie was still a little entertaining. But even though it was a little entertaining, that doesn’t mean that the film was good. However, a lot of the editing and camera work kind of helped with the comical nature that this film had.

One thing that I had noticed is that there were A LOT of cameos in this film. One of the parts that stood out to me was a montage of different Roc-A-Fella artists appearing, and they were addressed by their own stage names, as if they were playing themselves. But they were playing characters, that of drug dealers or gangsters who are running their own streets. Cam’ron even appeared twice as two different characters. It was also funny seeing Kanye West (This was earlier in his career, like in the days of “College Dropout” and “Late Registration”) playing a gangster. I have never seen him play a role like that ever. Even the late Ol’ Dirty Bastard, who was signed to Roc-A-Fella before his death, had a funny cameo as a fry cook. Even the Young Gunz (Man, just noting this REALLY DATES this movie; I wonder what happened to them) made appearances, except they actually had bigger roles than the other artists who made cameos.

I was a little surprised to see that I found myself enjoying a LOT more than its predecessor. I don’t think it’s a good film, but it felt more self-aware this time around than the first one did. The first one suffered from cheesy acting and writing, not to mention a lot of gratuitous stuff. This film still had some gratuitous stuff, but at least it had some entertainment value. It’s actually a movie that you can laugh with or at. Whatever works for you.

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Rap Movie Review – State Property

Year of Release: 2002

Film Studio: Lionsgate Films

*Sigh*  I know that I haven’t keeping up with this lately. On one hand, I have been contemplating writing about the rest of my Fast & Furious soundtracks. Another part of me wants to write about Death Row albums, particularly post-Tupac death and also when Dre and Snoop departed the label (Probably because I have been on a Death Row kick lately, especially having written the Death Row Records documentary). Then I have remembered that I also wanted to review the State Property films.

I know that there are plenty of rap movies out there to talk about. The State Property films fall into the same category as when I wrote about Thicker Than Water and Hot Boyz. For all the shit that I had talked about with those two, I think I have found a film that kind of blows them out of the water in terms of badness. I am sure that in some areas I still get a little nostalgic for Thicker Than Water and while I have spoken ill about Hot Boyz (Note to self: Watch other No Limit films), I think I may have found a film that I can put above it in terms of some of the worst rap movies that I have seen.

State Property is basically a movie that stars Beanie Sigel as a character named Beans who is trying to make a name for himself in the crime world. He wants to be feared and known by everyone and has a bunch of guys working for him. Of course, there are a bunch of gangster movie cliches of “one guy messing up and getting killed for it” or “someone pissed off the wrong guy, so he has to get tortured.” Not to mention drug deals gone wrong and women getting kidnapped, as well as random shootouts taking place. You get the picture.

Usually with these types of films, I don’t expect great acting from them. Also, the story has every cliche there is. It’s no secret that this film sucks. Although I will admit that there were moments when I laughed AT certain parts. But when these rappers on screen are only good at playing certain personas, that just showed how they needed to take acting lessons prior to it. It didn’t help that there was not a single likeable character in this film. Though Beans was the protagonist, there was nothing about to make me want to root for him.

It also was of no help how this film was loaded with misogyny. Now, don’t get me wrong, I like looking at scantily-clad women just as much as the next guy, but there was no purpose in some of the scenes with closeups of a woman’s body. Also, a minor spoiler, but in one scene when a deal took place, the camera turned and closed in on a couple of women sharing a rather gratuitous kiss. There was absolutely no reason for that part to even be in the movie other than fanservice.

While the poster said had Jay-Z billed, he was only in it for about five seconds max. The other Roc-A-Fella guys had bigger roles than Jigga himself. Damon Dash had a bigger role than Jay-Z, for crying out loud. Hell, I didn’t even expect to see Amil (Remember her? As in the woman in “Can I Get A…”?) in the film. It seemed like this was a film project for Roc-A-Fella.

I really don’t know what else to say about this film except that this was a bad film, though I think you may have already gotten the picture after reading all of this. I will admit that I remember flipping through channels and coming across it on HBO a long time ago and seeing how bad the acting was from the two minutes I saw of it. However, only one positive I can say about it was that it had a good soundtrack, which I may write about in the future.

Of course, I am aware of the sequel, which I will do next.

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Rap Movie Review – How High

Year of Release: 2001

Film Studio: Universal Pictures/Jersey Films/Native Pictures

When I wrote my review of The Wash, at the end of it I had noted about a much funnier movie that came out a month after that one, theatrically, I mean, I actually meant that it was indeed a funnier movie. The funny thing about these two movies is that they came out around the same time, with The Wash having come to theaters in November of 2001, while How High, the movie that this review is about, was released in theaters in December of that same year. So basically they both came out at roughly the end of that year.

A little personal history note, I remember having gone to see How High in theaters with my uncle. I was 15 at the time and being that I was already a big hip-hop head, I figured why not see this considering how I thought the movie looked funny and that I wanted to see Method Man and Redman on the big screen. I also remember being on my winter break at the time, not to mention it was also a few days before Christmas when I saw it.

One thing that will be said is that this film was a riot all the way through, in fact, in comparison to The Wash, it was not only funnier, but it also has a much different tone, which actually worked in this film.

There really isn’t much of a story in this film. It’s pretty basic, really. The story is about Silas (Method Man), a marijuana grower, and Jamal, a stoner, getting into Harvard and changing the Ivy League institution around and trying to get an education, but odds are against them in uptight Dean Cain (I wonder if that was intentional by the writers), played by Obba Babatunde. How they got there was through a spiritual source, if you know what I mean. Silas’s friend, Ivory died earlier on in the film, but because Silas had put his ashes into the soil of a cannabis plant, once he and Jamal smoked the Ivory weed, his ghost appears and helps them get through school. Of course, there is a romantic subplot as Silas becomes enamored with Lauren, played by Lark Voorhies (aka Lisa from Saved By The Bell), who is the girlfriend of secondary antagonist, Bart (Chris Elwood), the typical rich guy who looks down on Silas and Jamal.

Apart from the plot summary, this film is a straight-up stoner comedy that is similar to old Cheech & Chong films, as well as another stoner comedy cult favorite, Half-Baked. The title of the film is also named after the hit song of the same name from the two lead actors. Also, the tone of the film felt like a lowbrow comedy with very little to no ounce of seriousness in it. One part in the film that in another film would be a little more serious didn’t even take out anything humorous.

Also, unlike The Wash, Method Man and Redman had a lot more comedic chemistry than Dre and Snoop did. The thing about this film is that Meth seemed like the closest to being the straight man of the duo while Redman was more of the comedic sidekick. However, Meth had shown some comedic talent in some scenes. Even a few other supporting characters were also funny, like the character of Tuan. He had some excellent comedic timing in his lines. Also, Spalding Gray (RIP) had a hilarious scene as the Black History professor. Check out this scene below:

Also, being that this is a stoner movie, a lot of the references to weed were clever. While there were scenes of the two lead characters smoking and passing blunts and bongs, one of the weed references that was clever was the name of the exam that is needed to get into a good school. It was called “Testing for Higher Credentials.” Put the three first letters of those words together. Also, I noticed one character that wore a hoodie that said “Ivy League” on it and it had a cannabis leaf on it. I would wear a hoodie like that.

I also have to say that Lark Voorhies did a good job in her role as the love interest for Method Man’s character. I don’t think I have seen her in too many films that were given theatrical releases, yet this was one of them. The only other one I can think of is How To Be A Player, but she didn’t have a lot of screen-time in that film. It is a shame of what she has been through over the years and it doesn’t help that people will always see her as Lisa from Saved By The Bell. Plus, she did provide some eye candy in the film. In fact there were a lot of attractive women in this film, including the ever-so-lovely Essence Atkins.

Also, there was a brief cameo from Cypress Hill, who also performed in this film.

On the DVD of this film, there is an audio commentary track from both Method Man and Redman. It was funny to hear these two talk about the film and about certain scenes. Also, it seemed like Method Man was stoned at the start of the commentary. Maybe he actually was. It sure seemed like it. However, as time progressed, the duo really touched on a lot of things about the film. One of the parts that stood out was when Meth talked about Lark Voorhies’s performance, like how she made him think that she actually liked him. Also, there was a part where Meth talked about how he admits that he and Redman aren’t that great of actors but they did what they could in the film, given what they worked with.

How High is definitely a good example of a silly stoner movie done right. Now I am not surprised that this was given some negative reviews at the time of its release. It is really not a movie for everyone. This movie is basically on the same level as Half-Baked in that it had similar humor, not just the fact that there was a lot pot-smoking in the movie. Both films had a lot of crazy shit going on. I know I had mentioned The Wash at the start of this review, but when comparing those two films, How High wins this one. Now I don’t mind The Wash, even though I do believe it was not a good film, this film got a lot more laughs out of me. Both Meth and Redman had a lot of chemistry on-screen and there were plenty of funny moments even from some of the supporting cast, including one of the antagonists of the film. I also forgot to mention that Anna Maria Horsford was in this film as Jamal’s mother, which is funny considering how a few years after she played Meth’s mother on Method & Red (Note to self: Must get back to writing Method & Red episode reviews). Overall, in a nutshell, this was a hilarious movie.

Recommended, especially to hip-hop fans and those who also like to toke.

NEXT UP: The soundtracks to The Wash and How High, but I also have some other ideas in mind.

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